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Resource Bulletins

Dairy: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

I once thought I was lactose intolerant because I couldn't drink milk without major stomach pain, but then I realized it was the toxic pesticide contamination causing my problems. Now I'm a happy grass-fed milk drinker, satisfied butter spreader, and international cheese enthusiast. If I'm really feeling adventurous, you might even see me eating ice cream or enjoying a milkshake if I set aside my self-prescribed sugar restrictions for a rare moment.

Fruit: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

Some of the fruit cultivars that grow in central North Carolina are apples, pears, figs, nectarines, peaches, persimmons, plums, mulberries, blueberries, elderberries, blackberries, muscadine grapes, pawpaws, melon, and canteloupe. Hot summers in NC make it difficult to keep other fruits crops alive, such as cherries, ordinary grapes, raspberries, and apricots. Citrus trees and bananas face alternative growing difficulties.

Eggs: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

Omega-3 fatty acids in eggs may help stabilize blood triglyceride levels, and their carotenoid antioxidants may protect against common diseases. Eggs have choline and essential amino acids in ideal ratios for the human body, making them a great source of protein. Hard-boiled eggs serve as a quick, healthy substitute for high-carbohydrate snacks such as chips and crackers.

Pastries: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

Some pastries get their sweetness purely from fruit jams, giving them a lower glycemic index and more fiber. Those with nut butters and whole tree nuts also provide healthy fats and proteins. With a unique approach to baking, chicken pot pies and other meat pies provide a hearty serving of nutritious, wholesome proteins and fat in a handy serving format.

Cheese: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

Authentic cheese from a pastured grass-fed dairy is one of the most versatile ingredients in a farm-to-table cook's pantry. Nearly every culture in Europe that raises cows has developed its own type of cheese, most notably the Spanish, French, Germans, Swiss, and Italians. Whether you're baking a pizza, mixing up a salad, topping a meat entree, or eating it all by itself, it's worth trying a new flavor of cheese in your kitchen.

Leafy Greens: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

Vegetables: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

Poultry: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

Chicken and turkey come in many forms: cold cuts, wings, thighs, legs, breasts, sausages, whole birds, and more. Skin-on cuts make it easier to bake and retain moisture while also offering more protein for a tender, juicy meal. Free-range chicken is a better source of protein, yields eggs with more vitamins and omega-3 fatty acids, tastes better, and doesn't contain the amount of hormone disruptors that most caged chickens do. Free-range chickens have the opportunity to eat insects rather than relying purely on grains for their diet.

Beef: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

Red meat from cattle contains abundant quantities of iron, zinc, B vitamins, phosphorus, and selenium. Beef has very high protein content along with tallow fat. Like pork, beef offers bioavailable heme-iron, creatine, taurine amino acid, cholesterol, and glutathione antioxidant. Pasture-raised, grass-fed beef has more carotenoid antioxidants, a healthier fatty acid composition, more omega-3 fats and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), and higher vitamin E content than the more widespread grain-fed confined beef, including corned beef.

Baked Goods: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

Pretzels, biscuits, scones, whole wheat bread, pizza dough, dough starter, sourdough, naan, pitas, cornbread, arepas, and other baked goods are popular in people's food pantries, restaurants, and food stands throughout the world.

Pork: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

Common pork products include smoked ham, fresh ham, bacon, bratwurst, chorizo, kielbasa, andouille, and American sausage. There's also cured pork such as iberico and serrano ham, prosciutto, salami, pepperoni, summer sausage, and others that can last for a while at room temperature.Pork is high in fat and is one of the most complete sources of the nine essential amino acids that make up its proteins. It is also a rich source of bioavailable heme-iron, phosphorus, B vitamins, selenium, and zinc alongside bioactive muscle-building creatine, taurine amino acid, glutathione antioxidant, and beneficial cholesterol.

Seafood: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

Seafood contains healthy polyunsaturated omega-3 fats EPA and DHA, B vitamins, vitamin D, and vitamin A as well as the minerals selenium, zinc, iodine, and iron. It's also rich in proteins. Plant-based sources of fat provide ALA, a precursor to marine DHA and EPA.

Nuts: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

Although peanuts are not usually included since they're in legume family, they do have a somewhat similar nutritional profile. Nuts are high in beneficial fats, fiber, proteins, and polyphenol antioxidants that protect against cellular damage. They have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties that keep the digestive system working properly. A few common types of nuts include: almonds, brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts,macadamia nuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, walnuts.

Beans: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

Common legume varieties in the U.S. include black, kidney, navy, fava, soy, and pinto beans. They are a low-cost source of essential amino acids. Black beans are high in folate, phosphorus, carbohydrates, protein, and fiber which gives them a low glycemic index. Antinutrients such as phytic acid and lectin must be neutralized before eating by thoroughly soaking, sprouting, and cooking the beans. Raffinose fiber is another culprit for the flatulence, stomach pain, bloating, and general digestive problems that may result from eating beans.

Potatoes and Sweet Potatoes: Nutrition Facts and Information
Brian G. Schuster
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Nutrition Bulletin

Sweet potatoes are high in vitamin A, vitamin C, manganese, beta-carotene antioxidant, and fiber which slows the absorption of carbohydrates and lowers diabetic stress. North Carolina is the largest producer in the United States.

An Epidemic of Illness from Crop Control Chemicals
B. Rye Schuster
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Food & AgTech News

Using Hemp to Sustain Astronauts in the Cosmos
Brian G. Schuster
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Food & AgTech News

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Contact Us:
Text (919) 247-5542 or email bgschust@gmail.com.

We list and certify clean foods for budget-conscious businesses who are ready to go beyond organic in the Raleigh-Durham, Pittsboro, and Chapel Hill areas of central North Carolina, USA.
The Cropify directory makes it simple and easy for health and nutrition enthusiasts to discover pesticide-less foods, drinks, and topical products in NC's Piedmont region with access to certification info.
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